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tonight, earthquake. scenes out of a disaster film. when a earthquake struck off the coast of japan today it set off destruction the likes of which we have never seen before. it set off a tsunami that swept over rural and urban areas with devastating results. the 8.9 quake was the strongest in japanese history. strongest on record anywhere ever. the latest from japan and from experts in america. the u.s. is offering to help with rescue and airlift operations. the quake led to tsunami warnings in hawaii, alaska, and the west coast of the u.s. there was no real damage. plus, that's what it was. here's what wisconsin senate majority leader told fox news about the battle against unions out there. if we win this battle, and the money is not there under the auspices of the unions, certainly what you are going to find is president obama is going to have a much more difficult time getting elected and winning the state of wisconsin. there you have it. in black and white. look for democrats to use wisconsin as a rallying cry in 2012. gas lines from republicans. first haley barber suggested presiden
could lead to the comeback of the u.s. labor movement. we start with the earthquake in japan. an nbc news producer based in tokyo. i've been watching your coverage. i've been watching what you had to say about this and all i can tell you, i do see a lot of disaster movies. this looked real and very scary. what was it like? >> reporter: this happened 180 miles authority of tokyo. we felt it all the way down here in tokyo. it was so bad that i couldn't stand. you had to sort of crowd a little bit to not fall down. >> i just saw a picture. a picture looking through the windshield of a car, apparently on the streets up there. you know, i remember being through a very mild earthquake in northern california and if you're in a car you don't even feel it. i'm watching that car rocking and rolling, even in a car with shocks and tires you can see the action. you were watching -- tell me what you were doing, what you're going to remember when you tell your grandkids about today and yesterday. >> well, you know, obviously the pictures that have come through the aerial pictures of the tsunami i t
next from the crisis in libya to japan, we will switch back to that big story. u.s. officials say the crisis in japan is worse than three mile island. category five. we will get to the latest to avertd a meltdown. castrol syntec has been reformulated for better performance under the hood. so we gave it a new name. castrol edge with syntec power technology. new name. better formula. it's more than just oil. it's liquid engineering. >>> welcome back to hardball. japan raised its rating to a five on a seven-point scale. the crisis now even surpassed three-mile island. that's the standard. there it is on the score on the grid. time is running out. workers raced to avoid a full-blown meltdown and more of the situation in the nuclear problem, the former senior nuclear power plant operator. and david albright, a former nuclears inspector and president for the institute of science international security. well, michael, let's go to the whole question. what does it mean to go to five? >> probably the more relevant point is is that it's a three-mile island. the real bottom line here is that
in japan. u.s. officials now say the nuclear crisis in japan is worse than three mile island. it's a category five. an we'll get to the latest in the effort to avoid a melt down. you're watching "hardball." >>> welcome back to "hardball." jan has raised its rating of that nuclear disaster to a level five on a seven-point scale and a former member of the nuclear regulatory commission from this country said the crisis surpassed three mile island. there it is on that grid. time is running out as workers feverishly race to prevent a full-blown meltdown and a nuclear chain reaction. more on the desperate situation. let's turn to mike it will freedlander, a former senior nuclear power plant operator and david albright, president of the institute for science and international security. well, mike, let's go to this whole question. what does it mean to go to five? >> well, probably the more relevant point is what does it mean to be similar to three mile island. the bottom line is we have a situation where the nuclear complex has been compromised as a result of a station blackout. the reac
in japan with even more people now being encouraged, not forced, to get out of the area. how great is the danger? plus, with hispanics making up one out of every six americans and one out of every four children, how long can republicans be seen as hostile to their interests? the huge implications of the census report on the 2012 presidential election. >>> finally, what's a serious candidate to do? how does anyone who actually believes they have a chance of winning the republican nomination get heard when people like michele bachmann, sarah palin and, yes, even our friend up there in new york, donald trump, are taking up all the oxygen, but we'll start with what's next on the libyan front. nbc chief foreign correspondent richard engel is in benghazi. after a harrowing couple of days covering the war and richard, what happened today on the ground that you've seen? >> reporter: today we went out of benghazi and instead of going to the rebel front line 100 miles south of here, we went to the front line and went around it and were able to get inside the city of ajdabiya. ajdabiya is par
radiation from that crippled nuclear power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged, not forced, to get out of the area. how great is the danger? >>> plus with hispanics making up 1 in every 6 americans and one in every 1 ever 4 children, the huge emphasis on the 2012 election. >>> finally, how does anyone who actually believes they have a chance of winning the republican nomination get heard when people like michele bachmann, sarah palin and donald trump are taking up the oxygen. >>> we start with what's next on the libyan front. nbc chief foreign correspondent d geis bghi, afr heldg up of da. whatapnetoy t ou ilia atoue en >> reporter: today we went out of benghazi. and instead of going to the rebel frontline about 100 miles south of here, we went to the frontline and then went around it. and we were able to get inside the city of ajdabiya. ajdabiya is partially held by gadhafi forces and partially held by the rebels themselves. there is street-to-street fighting in the city. in a way, this is progress, the rebels would not have been able to get this far if gadha
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6